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Optimum temperature range for the proton dynamics in H-doped BaZrO3:Yb dense ceramics—a neutron scattering study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2012

Aneta Slodczyk*
Affiliation:
LADIR, UMR 7075, CNRS, Université P. et M. Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France
Philippe Colomban
Affiliation:
LADIR, UMR 7075, CNRS, Université P. et M. Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France
Daniel Lamago
Affiliation:
Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CNRS-CEA Saclay, 91119 Gif-sur-Yvette, France; and Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Institut für Festkörperphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany
Gilles André
Affiliation:
Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CNRS-CEA Saclay, 91119 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
Oumaya Zaafrani
Affiliation:
LADIR, UMR 7075, CNRS, Université P. et M. Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France
Olivier Lacroix
Affiliation:
AREVA NP & Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, France
Abdelkader Sirat
Affiliation:
AREVA NP & Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, France
Frédéric Grasset
Affiliation:
AREVA NP & Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, France
Béatrice Sala
Affiliation:
AREVA NP & Université Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier, France
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: aneta.slodczyk@upmc.fr
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Abstract

The proton conducting perovskite MZr1−xLnxO3−δHz ceramics are promising electrolytic membranes for fuel cell and water steam electrolyser applications. Simultaneous elastic/quasielastic and diffraction neutron studies were performed in a wide temperature range (25–1150 °C) on protonated Yb-modified BaZrO3 ceramics: dense (97% of theoretical density) and ultradense (99%) using the triple axis spectrometers. The results allowed us to determine: (i) the real content of bulk protonic species ∼1–5 10−3 mol/mol, (ii) the structural modifications caused by the proton doping, and (iii) the bulk proton dynamics. The quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS) results are discussed in the light of neutron diffraction, conductivity, Raman, thermogravimetric, and thermal expansion measurements. The highest bulk proton motion appears in the temperature range where the structural modifications and the energy activation changes are detected. This allows defining the optimum temperature range for the proton dynamics between 400 and 560 °C.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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Optimum temperature range for the proton dynamics in H-doped BaZrO3:Yb dense ceramics—a neutron scattering study
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