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Mechanochemistry of the titanium–silicon system: Compositional effects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

S. Doppiu
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari, Italy
M. Monagheddu
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari, Italy
G. Cocco
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari, Italy
F. Maglia
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Chemistry and C.S.T.E./CNR, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 16, 27100 Pavia, Italy
U. Anselmi-Tamburini
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Chemistry and C.S.T.E./CNR, University of Pavia, V.le Taramelli 16, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Z. A. Munir
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616–5294
Corresponding
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Abstract

The mechanochemical behavior of the Ti–Si system was investigated across the whole composition range at a constant milling intensity. At low Si content the mechanical alloying process leads progressively to an amorphous structure. In the central range of the equilibrium diagram, crystalline intermetallic compounds form with a combustion-like behavior. A nanostructured composite of TiSi2 gradually evolves above the Ti25Si75 stoichiometry. Transformation behaviors relate to the thermodynamic and thermochemical properties of the tested mixtures as well as with their mechanical features and structural refinement, which change drastically within the explored composition range.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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