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The mechanism of mechanical alloying of MoSi2

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

S.N. Patankar
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7204
S-Q. Xiao
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7204
J.J. Lewandowski
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7204
A.H. Heuer
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7204
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Abstract

An incubation time exists for the formation of MoSi2 by mechanical alloying (MA). For the particular milling conditions employed, the bulk of MoSi2 formation occurs between 3 h and 12 min and 3 h and 13 min. This abrupt formation of MoSi2 during MA suggests that the reaction occurs by a form of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), when a critical amount of stored energy (in the form of interfacial energy and cold work) is introduced by MA, and increases the adiabatic reaction temperature sufficiently to make the reaction self-sustaining.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

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