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Liquid supercoolings and droplet cooling rates of remelted argon-atomized Fe–30Ni powder particles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Matthew R. Libera
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
Pedro P. Bolsaitis
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
R. Erik Spjut
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
John B. VanderSande
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
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Abstract

Individual particles of argon-atomized Fe-30Ni powder are electrodynamically levitated and remelted by a CO2 laser pulse. The thermal history of each droplet during remelting and solidification is monitored by single-color radiation pyrometry at each of three wavelengths (850, 750, and 550 nm). Experiments are done in an atmosphere of either air or nitrogen. The average supercooling of six experiments performed in nitrogen is 298 K with a standard deviation of 14 K. This value is of the same order as several others reported in the literature using bulk levitation and emulsification techniques. The average supercooling of seven experiments performed in air is 163 K with a standard deviation of 20 K. The difference suggests that oxides are forming in the air-remelting experiments and catalyzing nucleation at relatively low supercoolings. The average cooling rate of the liquid droplets prior to solidification in nitrogen is 1.5 × 105 K/s. This measured cooling rate is somewhat higher than that predicted by Newtonian heat flow modeling, and the difference is attributed to radiative losses not considered in the Newtonian model. The measured cooling rate is used to estimate the total heat transfer coefficient characterizing cooling of a small metal droplet in a quiescent gas atmosphere. A lower bound of 1.5 × 106 K/s on the droplet heating rate during recalescence and a minimum average liquid/solid interfacial velocity during recalescence of 0.1 m/s are estimated.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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References

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