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Laser metal deposition and selective laser melting of Fe–28 at.% Al

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2014

Gesa Rolink*
Affiliation:
Additive Manufacturing and Functional Layers, Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Aachen 52074, Germany
Sabrina Vogt
Affiliation:
Additive Manufacturing and Functional Layers, Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Aachen 52074, Germany
Lucia Senčekova
Affiliation:
Structure and Nano-/Micromechanics of Materials, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH MPIE, Düsseldorf 40237, Germany
Andreas Weisheit
Affiliation:
Additive Manufacturing and Functional Layers, Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Aachen 52074, Germany
Reinhart Poprawe
Affiliation:
Chair for Laser Technology, RWTH Aachen, Aachen 52074, Germany
Martin Palm
Affiliation:
Structure and Nano-/Micromechanics of Materials, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH MPIE, Düsseldorf 40237, Germany
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: gesa.rolink@ilt.fraunhofer.de
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Abstract

The iron aluminide Fe3Al has been successfully processed by selective laser melting (SLM) and laser metal deposition (LMD). Process parameters have been determined by which defect free and dense (>99.5%) samples were produced. However, due to the low thermal conductivity of Fe3Al, preheating the substrate to 200 °C was necessary to prevent cracking during cooling. Microstructural characterization by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) showed that in spite of the high cooling rates large elongated grains grew in the building direction, more distinctive for SLM than for LMD. These grains show a continuous change in the crystallographic orientation. Evaluation of the compressive flow stress showed that the anisotropic microstructure results in anisotropic mechanical properties, depending whether the samples are loaded in building direction or perpendicular to it. The alloy shows a very high strength up to 600 °C and – concerning the coarse microstructure – becomes ductile already at low temperatures.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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