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The influence of an electric field on the mechanism of combustion synthesis of tungsten silicides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

S. Gedevanishvili
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616-5294
Z.A. Munir
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616-5294
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Abstract

The synthesis of tungsten silicides by self-propagating combustion has been successfully accomplished under the influence of an electric field. Materials with starting composition ranging from 6 to 30 wt. % Si were investigated by the method of field-activated combustion synthesis (FACS). A threshold field value was required to initiate a self-sustaining wave; the threshold value depended on composition. It was shown that the level of the applied field can influence the mechanism of silicide formation. The silicide W5Si3 could be formed only at relatively high field values while WSi2 can be formed at any field. The effect of the field on the silicide formation is discussed in terms of its role in liquid phase formation.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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