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Facile preparation of macro-mesoporous zirconium titanate monoliths via a sol–gel reaction accompanied by phase separation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 September 2019

Mingliang Sun
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 102488, China
Tianbo Zhao*
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 102488, China
Zhaofei Ma
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 102488, China
Zunfeng Li
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 102488, China
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: bit_bipt@126.com
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Abstract

Macro-mesoporous zirconium titanate monoliths have been successfully prepared via a sol–gel process accompanied by phase separation, with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) as a phase separation inducer and N-methylformamide (NFA) as a gelation accelerator. The size and morphology of macropores are controlled by the PEO and NFA amount. By choosing appropriate starting composition, the co-continuous structure could be obtained. The as-dried gel is amorphous, the pore size is in the range of 0.05–0.5 μm, the porosity is 46%, and the surface area is 111 m2/g. After heat treatment at 500 °C, the gel transforms into the phase ZrTiO4, the macropore diameter decreases slightly, the porosity increases to 63%, and the surface area decreases to 40 m2/g. Moreover, the macroporous structure is well maintained, and the skeleton becomes dense and smooth. The samples have macropores, mesopores, and micropores before and after heat treatment.

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Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

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