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Fabrication of thermoplastic polyurethane tissue engineering scaffold by combining microcellular injection molding and particle leaching

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2014

Hao-Yang Mi
Affiliation:
School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China; and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706
Xin Jing
Affiliation:
National Engineering Research Center of Novel Equipment for Polymer Processing, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China; and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706
Max R. Salick
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706
Lih-Sheng Turng
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706
Xiang-Fang Peng
Affiliation:
National Engineering Research Center of Novel Equipment for Polymer Processing, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
Corresponding
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Abstract

Microcellular injection molding, a process capable of mass-producing complex plastic parts, and particle leaching methods were combined to fabricate porous thermoplastic polyurethane tissue engineering scaffolds. Water soluble polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and sodium chloride (NaCl) were used as porogens to improve the porosity and interconnectivity as well as the hydrophilicity of the scaffolds. It was found in the study that the microcellular injection molding process was effective at producing high pore density and porosity. The addition of PVOH decreased the pore diameter and increased the pore density. Furthermore, scaffolds with NaCl and PVOH porogens showed more interconnected pores. The 3T3 fibroblast cell culture was used to confirm the biocompatibility of the scaffolds. Residual PVOH content after leaching increased the hydrophilicity of the scaffolds and further improved cell adhesion and proliferation. The resulting scaffolds offer an alternative scalable tissue scaffold fabrication method for soft tissue scaffold production.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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