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Fabrication of silicon carbide nanoceramics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Mamoru Mitomo
Affiliation:
National Institute for Research in Inorganic Materials, 1–1, Namiki, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, 305, Japan
Young-Wook Kim
Affiliation:
Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Cheongryang Seoul, Korea
Hideki Hirotsuru
Affiliation:
Research Center, Denki Kagaku Kogyo Co., 3–5-1 Asahimachi, Machida, Tokyo, 194, Japan
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Abstract

Ultrafine silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of 90 nm was densified by hot-processing with the addition of Al2O3, Y2O3, and CaO at 1750 °C. Silicon carbide nanoceramics with an average grain size of 110 nm were prepared by liquid phase sintering at low temperature. The materials showed superplastic deformation at a strain rate of 5.0 × 10-4/s at 1700 °C, which is the lowest temperature published. The microstructure and deformation behavior of materials from a submicrometer powder were also investigated as a reference.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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