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Comparison of citrate–nitrate gel combustion and precursor plasma spray processes for the synthesis of yttrium aluminum garnet

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

P. Sujatha Devi
Affiliation:
Center for Thermal Spray Research, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794–2275
Yongjae Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794–2275
Joshua Margolis
Affiliation:
Center for Thermal Spray Research, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794–2275
John B. Parise
Affiliation:
Center for Thermal Spray Research, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Geosciences, and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794–2275
Sanjay Sampath
Affiliation:
Center for Thermal Spray Research, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794–2275
Herbert Herman
Affiliation:
Center for Thermal Spray Research, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794–2275
Jonathan C. Hanson
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973
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Abstract

The influence of synthesis conditions on the formation of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) powders starting from the same solution precursors was investigated by employing a citrate–nitrate gel combustion process and a precursor plasma spraying technique. YAG powders were formed at ≥500 °C, through the citrate–nitrate gel combustion process, without any intermediate phase formation. Time-resolved x-ray experiments were performed for the first time on these citrate–nitrate precursor materials to understand their mode of decomposition. The in situ data confirmed a single-step conversion to YAG from the precursor powder without any intermediate phase formation. Ex situ experiments also produced similar results. However, the use of the same citrate–nitrate precursor solution as a liquid feedstock material in the precursor plasma spraying technique revealed an entirely different transformation mechanism to YAG through intermediate phases like H–YalO3 and O–YalO3.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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Comparison of citrate–nitrate gel combustion and precursor plasma spray processes for the synthesis of yttrium aluminum garnet
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