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Can carbon-implanted silicon be applied as wide-bandgap emitter?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

D. J. Oostra
Affiliation:
Philips Research Laboratories, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindoven, The Netherlands
J. Politiek
Affiliation:
Philips Research Laboratories, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindoven, The Netherlands
C. W. T. Bulle-Lieuwma
Affiliation:
Philips Research Laboratories, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindoven, The Netherlands
D. E. W. Vandenhoudt
Affiliation:
Philips Research Laboratories, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindoven, The Netherlands
P. C. Zalm
Affiliation:
Philips Research Laboratories, Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindoven, The Netherlands
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Abstract

We examine the formation of Si1-xCx (x = 0.04–0.2) by means of CFy (y = 0,1,3) implantation in p-type Si, for application as a wide-bandgap emitter in a Si heterojunc-tion bipolar transistor. Upon implantation with 2.5 × 1016 CF+/cm2 at 45 keV, and subsequently with 2.5 × 1016 C+/cm2 at 30 keV, an amorphous top layer is formed. Annealing at temperatures up to 900 °C leads to a layer consisting of nanocrystalline material. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry show that a well-defined nanocrystalline/crystalline interface is created at an anneal temperature of 550 °C. At higher temperatures lattice defects start to develop. Preliminary attempts to dope the material via phosphorus or arsenic implantation indicate that temperatures of at least 900 °C are required to activate a fraction of the implanted dopants. This, however, adversely affects the adlayer/substrate interface.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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Can carbon-implanted silicon be applied as wide-bandgap emitter?
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