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Assessment of single-fiber fragmentation using scanning acoustic microscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Shamachary Sathish
Affiliation:
Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469-0127
Madhu S. Madhukar
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2030
John H. Cantrell
Affiliation:
NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 231, Hampton, Virginia 23681-2199
William T. Yost
Affiliation:
NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 231, Hampton, Virginia 23681-2199
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Abstract

Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) was used to obtain the critical fragmentation length of a 7-μm-diameter carbon fiber embedded in an optically transparent epoxy matrix and was subjected to a standard fiber fragmentation test. The SAM-assessed critical fragmentation length of 356 ± 59.5 μm compared favorably with the value 341 ± 52.3 μm obtained independently from commonly used photoelastic techniques. Additionally, the SAM images allowed an assessment of regions of fiber-matrix debond, including the measurement of an average debond of 61.0 ± 11.8 μm along the fiber from the fragment ends, which could not be obtained with photoelastic methods. The application of SAM to the assessment of optically opaque composite materials is explained in this paper.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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