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An efficient way of extracting creep properties from short-time spherical indentation tests

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2015

Felix Rickhey
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742, Republic of Korea
Jin Haeng Lee*
Affiliation:
Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353, Republic of Korea
Hyungyil Lee*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742, Republic of Korea
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: hylee@sogang.ac.kr
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Abstract

Indentation as a means to extract creep properties has the advantage that it can be applied directly to micro/nano-structures. Many studies on indentation creep reported at least partially poor agreement with creep parameters derived from uniaxial test. One important reason for the incompatibility is the neglect of transient creep. Another one is the choice of equivalent stress and strain measures to relate the different material responses. Applying a material model that accounts for transient creep effects we propose an efficient method for deriving creep properties from short-time spherical indentation tests. We first determine a subsurface point where the material response is very close to that observed in uniaxial tests. We then map the load–displacement data to the material response, expressed in terms of two dimensionless variables, at this point. Converting the dimensionless variables data to stress, strain, and strain rate data, we finally determine the material's creep coefficient and exponent.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2015 

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