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Social Solidarity in Health Care, American-Style

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Abstract

The ACA shifted U.S. health policy from centering on principles of actuarial fairness toward social solidarity. Yet four legal fixtures of the health care system have prevented the achievement of social solidarity: federalism, fiscal pluralism, privatization, and individualism. Future reforms must confront these fixtures to realize social solidarity in health care, American-style.

Type
Symposium Articles
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2020

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References

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