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Long-term follow up of sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients treated with intratympanic steroids: audiological and quality of life evaluation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2014

I Dallan
Affiliation:
First ENT Unit, University of Pisa, Italy
S Fortunato
Affiliation:
First ENT Unit, University of Pisa, Italy
A P Casani
Affiliation:
First ENT Unit, University of Pisa, Italy
E Bernardini
Affiliation:
First ENT Unit, University of Pisa, Italy
S Sellari-Franceschini
Affiliation:
First ENT Unit, University of Pisa, Italy
S Berrettini
Affiliation:
ENT Audiology Phoniatry Unit, Department of Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Italy
A Nacci
Affiliation:
ENT Audiology Phoniatry Unit, Department of Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Italy
Corresponding
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Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the long-term stability of intratympanic steroids and investigate the ‘real’ impact of sudden sensorineural hearing loss on patients.

Method:

A total of 14 patients treated with intratympanic steroids were evaluated by audiometric and vestibular examinations. The modified Glasgow Benefit Inventory was used to evaluate quality of life changes after intratympanic steroid treatment.

Results:

There was no significant difference between pure tone average post-intratympanic steroids and at follow up. The general Glasgow Benefit Inventory score was not significantly associated with the presence of tinnitus or dizziness, or with patient age. The change in pure tone average after intratympanic steroid treatment did not correlate with social or physical scores, but correlated strongly with the general Glasgow Benefit Inventory score (p = 0.0023). Intratympanic steroid administration led to a stable improvement in hearing. Quality of life assessment showed that patients can feel satisfaction regardless of the hearing outcome. Patients who regained a social hearing level expressed greater satisfaction than patients without serviceable hearing. Overall, quality of life improvement was not related to hearing improvement.

Conclusion:

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is devastating. Considering the audiological effects alone ignores the ‘human’ perspective. Audiological success can correlate with poor quality of life outcome.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2014 

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References

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Long-term follow up of sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients treated with intratympanic steroids: audiological and quality of life evaluation
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