Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7mfl8 Total loading time: 0.249 Render date: 2021-12-04T00:13:54.790Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Follow-up results in tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 November 2005

Mehmet F Oktay
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey
Ismail Topcu
Affiliation:
Department of Chest Diseases, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey
Abdurrahman Senyigit
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey
Aslan Bilici
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey
Adem Arslan
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Sebahattin Cureoglu
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey
Muzeyyen Yildirim
Affiliation:
Department of Chest Diseases, Dicle University Medical School, Diyarbakir, Turkey
Get access

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of medical antituberculous treatment in patients with tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis (TCL).

Methods: In the period 1996–2002, 73 TCL patients were reviewed and the results of clinical and laboratory testing were documented. The efficacy of a four-drug chemotherapy regimen was investigated.

Results: Purified protein derivatives (PPD) skin test results were positive in 58 (79 per cent) patients. Chest X-rays revealed changes consistent with tuberculosis in nine (12.3 per cent) patients. The mean duration of medical treatment was 10.04 months. In follow-up evaluation, 14 (20 per cent) patients were considered suspicious for resistant TCL and total excision of all nodes was performed. Histopathology confirmed TB in only 10 of these cases.

Conclusion: The high incidence of residual disease in our study indicates that medical treatment (at least nine months of four combined antituberculous drugs) did not seem to be effective. If lymphadenopathy persists, total surgical excision of lymph nodes should be the treatment of choice.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
© 2005 JLO (1984) Limited

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

This paper was presented at the annual American Academy of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO–HNSF) meeting, 19–22 September 2004, New York, New York, USA.
7
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Follow-up results in tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Follow-up results in tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Follow-up results in tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *