Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-dkwk2 Total loading time: 0.705 Render date: 2021-07-31T05:49:46.762Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Dynamic cine imaging of the Eustachian tube using four-dimensional computed tomography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2016

N Jufas
Affiliation:
Division of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada Discipline of Surgery, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Australia
N Deveau
Affiliation:
Independent contributor, Halifax, Canada
M Bance
Affiliation:
Division of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

Background:

Imaging the Eustachian tube has proven difficult as it has an anatomical orientation that is not aligned with standard planes. In addition, the Eustachian tube is a dynamic structure, opening briefly during a variety of physiological manoeuvres.

Case report:

A 54-year-old healthy and asymptomatic man underwent computed tomography utilising an area detector scanner. Multiplanar reconstruction was performed at 1 mm intervals. In addition, dynamic clips were constructed to demonstrate air and its movement in the field. Images and video were acquired whilst a Valsalva manoeuvre was being performed.

Conclusion:

Although imaging techniques have been able to visualise the Eustachian tube well in the closed state, it may be more useful to have it imaged whilst open. Area detector computed tomography scanners can be used to acquire four-dimensional images. This allows dynamic imaging of the region, to assist in the diagnosis of various types of Eustachian tube dysfunction.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 Adil, E, Poe, D. What is the full range of medical and surgical treatments available for patients with Eustachian tube dysfunction? Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2014;22:815 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2 Tarabichi, M, Najmi, M. Visualization of the Eustachian tube lumen with Valsalva computed tomography. Laryngoscope 2015;125:724–9CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3 Lükens, A, Dimartino, E, Günther, RW, Krombach, GA. Functional MR imaging of the Eustachian tube in patients with clinically proven dysfunction: correlation with lesions detected on MR images. Eur Radiol 2012;22:533–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Yoshioka, S, Naito, K, Fujii, N, Katada, K. Movement of the Eustachian tube during sniffing in patients with patulous Eustachian tube: evaluation using a 320-row area detector CT scanner. Otol Neurotol 2013;34:877–83CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5Toshiba Medical Systems. Toshiba manufactures milestone 1000th 320-row area detector CT, Aquilion ONE. News Release, 2015. In: http://www.toshibamedicalsystems.com/news/2015/150701.htm [26 April 2016]Google Scholar
6Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology. Costs vs. Benefits: Comparing 64-Slice to 256, 320-Slice CT. In: http://www.dicardiology.com/article/costs-vs-benefits-comparing-64-slice-256-320-slice-ct [26 April 2016]Google Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Jufas supplementary material

Supplementary Video

Download Jufas supplementary material(File)
File 9 MB
3
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Dynamic cine imaging of the Eustachian tube using four-dimensional computed tomography
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Dynamic cine imaging of the Eustachian tube using four-dimensional computed tomography
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Dynamic cine imaging of the Eustachian tube using four-dimensional computed tomography
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *