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Are laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma incidence and patient mortality a function of ABO blood grouping? A retrospective study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2011

S I Adam
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Brain Tumor Center, University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA
K M Wilson
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Brain Tumor Center, University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA
S M Overholser
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Brain Tumor Center, University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA
E Khabbaz
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Brain Tumor Center, University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA
K Moreno
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Brain Tumor Center, University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA
Y J Patil
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Brain Tumor Center, University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio, USA
Corresponding
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Abstract

Objective:

Few studies have examined the association between ABO blood grouping and head and neck cancer. This retrospective review examined the association between blood group and laryngeal cancer incidence and patient mortality.

Methods:

Of 271 patients treated for squamous cell laryngeal carcinoma (1997–2002), 143 patients with supraglottic, glottic and subglottic tumours were included; 128 patients were excluded. The blood group characteristics of patients and healthy blood donors were compared.

Results:

There was no significant correlation between blood type and laryngeal carcinoma incidence or mortality. Type A blood was commoner in African Americans with laryngeal cancer than Caucasian patients, but not significantly so. As expected, five-year survival rates were lower in patients with more advanced stage cancer (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion:

Although our findings show no association between blood group and five-year survival, these results are inconclusive, and warrant further study of the association between blood type and laryngeal (and other) head and neck cancers.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2011

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References

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