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Absence of contralateral suppression of transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions in fibromyalgia syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 March 2008

B Gunduz
Affiliation:
Department of Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey
Y A Bayazit
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey
F Celenk*
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey
C Sarıdoğan
Affiliation:
Department of Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey
A G Guclu
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Turkey
E Orcan
Affiliation:
Department of Audiology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey
J Meray
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey
*
Address for correspondence: Dr Fatih Celenk, Dept of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. E-mail: facelenk@yahoo.com
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Abstract

Objective:

To assess contralateral suppression of transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and normal hearing.

Methods:

Twenty-four female patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and 24 healthy female controls with normal hearing were assessed using pure tone audiometry and transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions.

Results:

All patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and all controls had normal hearing on pure tone audiometry. In the patients with fibromyalgia syndrome, the mean transiently evoked otoacoustic emission amplitude was 15.5 ± 4.8 dB. The mean transiently evoked otoacoustic emission amplitudes after contralateral suppression was 15.5 ± 4.9 dB. There was no statistically significant difference between the transiently evoked otoacoustic emission amplitudes measured before and after contralateral suppression (p > 0.05). In the controls, the mean transiently evoked otoacoustic emission amplitude was 12 ± 5 dB. The mean transiently evoked otoacoustic emission amplitudes after contralateral suppression was 11 ± 4.7 dB. There was a statistically significant decrease in transiently evoked otoacoustic emission amplitudes after contralateral suppression (p < 0.01).

Conclusion:

The mechanisms related to contralateral suppression of transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions seem dysfunctional in fibromyalgia syndrome. This dysfunction may be at the brain stem level, where the medial superior olivary complex is located, or at the synapses of medial superior olivary complex fibres with the outer hair cells in the cochlea. Demonstration of lack of contralateral suppression of transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions can be used as a diagnostic tool in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2008

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