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Predilection sites of Trichinella spiralis larvae in naturally infected horses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2007

E. Pozio*
Affiliation:
Istituto Superiore di Sanità, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
F. Paterlini
Affiliation:
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia Brescia, Italy
C. Pedarra
Affiliation:
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata Foggia, Italy
L. Sacchi
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Biology University of Pavia, Piazza Botta 9, 27100 Pavia, Italy
R. Bugarini
Affiliation:
Istituto Superiore di Sanità, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome, Italy
E. Goffredo
Affiliation:
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata Foggia, Italy
P. Boni
Affiliation:
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia Brescia, Italy
*
*Fax: +39 06 4938 7065 E-mail: pozio@iss.it

Abstract

A total of 120 muscle tissues from three horses naturally infected with Trichinella spiralis were examined. The head was the most infected site. In particular, the muscles harbouring the highest number of larvae were: musculus buccinator (12, 411 and 1183 larvae g-1), the tongue (11, 615 and 1749 larvae g-1), m. levator labii maxillaris (17, 582 and 1676 larvae g-1), and the masseter (4.9, 289 and 821 larvae g-1). Compared with the diaphragm, the number of larvae per gram was from 3.5 to 6.8 times higher in the tongue, from 3.5 to 6.5 higher in m. levator labii maxillaris, and from 2.5 to 4.6 higher in m. buccinator. Of the examined muscles, the diaphragm had from the 6th to the 15th highest level of infection (3.1, 166 and 256 larvae g-1). Published data from experimentally infected horses confirm these results, suggesting that efforts to detect predilection sites should focus on the head muscles.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Cambridge University Press 1999

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