Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-rcd7l Total loading time: 0.166 Render date: 2021-10-23T18:51:15.588Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Parasite development and visceral pathology in Galba truncatula co-infected with Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2007

D. Rondelaud*
Affiliation:
UPRES EA no. 3174/USC INRA, Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Pharmacy, 87025 Limoges, France
P. Vignoles
Affiliation:
UPRES EA no. 3174/USC INRA, Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Pharmacy, 87025 Limoges, France
G. Dreyfuss
Affiliation:
UPRES EA no. 3174/USC INRA, Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Pharmacy, 87025 Limoges, France
*
*Fax: 33-555-435893 E-mail: daniel.rondelaud@unilim.fr

Abstract

Histological investigations in Galba truncatula naturally or experimentally co-infected with Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi were carried out to study parasite development and the responses of the digestive gland and kidney of snails, as larval forms of these digeneans often use these two sites for their growth within the snail's body. The number of live rediae per snail ranged from 2.4 to 4.2 for the dominating parasite (it developed in the digestive gland) and was less than 2.0 for the other species. When the dominating species was F. hepatica, most snails harboured cercariae-containing rediae; if this parasite was P. daubneyi, procercariae-containing rediae with or without free procercariae were observed in most snails. In contrast, most rediae of the other species were immature. The pathology caused by the dominating species in the digestive gland was greater than that recorded in the kidney, where the other parasite was generally located. The most frequent tissue lesions in the digestive gland were generalized epithelial necrosis and epithelial reconstitution. In the kidney, multifocal epithelial necrosis was frequently observed, particularly when P. daubneyi was the dominating species. The frequencies of lesions in the digestive gland agreed with percentages reported by our team in other snails mono-infected with F. hepatica or P. daubneyi. In contrast, multifocal necrosis in the kidney was clearly greater in the present study and this finding might be explained by assuming that a sufficient number of free larvae within the snail would be necessary for the development of epithelial necrosis in the whole kidney.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abrous, M., Rondelaud, D. & Dreyfuss, G. (1996) Paramphistomum daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica: the effect of dual infection on prevalence and cercarial shedding in preadult Lymnaea glabra. Journal of Parasitology 82, 10261029.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Abrous, M., Roumieux, L., Dreyfuss, G., Rondelaud, D. & Mage, C. (1998) Proposition d'une technique simple pour la production métacercarienne de Fasciola hepatica Linné à partir du mollusque Lymnaea truncatula Müller. Revue de Médecine Vétérinaire (Toulouse) 149, 943948.Google Scholar
Abrous, M., Rondelaud, D. & Dreyfuss, G. (2000) Cercarial productivity of each redial generation in single-miracidium infections of Lymnaea truncatula with Paramphistomum daubneyi or Fasciola hepatica. Journal of Helminthology 74, 15.Google ScholarPubMed
Augot, D., Abrous, M., Rondelaud, D. & Dreyfuss, G. (1996) Paramphistomum daubneyi and Fasciola hepatica: the redial burden and cercarial shedding in Lymnaea truncatula submitted to successive unimiracidial cross-exposures. Parasitology Research 82, 623627.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barber, I.W. (1962) The pathology produced in the snail Lymnaea columella Say, 1817, by the larval stages of Fasciola hepatica L., 1758. PhD thesis, Berkeley, University of California.Google Scholar
De Jong-Brink, M. (1990) How trematode parasites interfere with reproduction of their intermediate hosts, freshwater snails. Journal of Medical and Applied Malacology 2, 101133.Google Scholar
Hourdin, P., Rondelaud, D. & Cabaret, J. (1990) Evolution of tissue lesions in Lymnaea truncatula infected by Muellerius capillaris and by Neostrongylus linearis (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae). Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée 65, 249254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moukrim, A. & Rondelaud, D. (1992) Chronology of visceral lesions and correlation with the course of the parasite development in Lymnaea truncatula in single and dual infections by three trematode species. Research and Reviews in Parasitology 52, 3945.Google Scholar
Moukrim, A., Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1988) Les effets d'une concentration sublétale de trichlorfon chez le mollusque Lymnaea peregra ovata Müller. A propos de quelques observations histopathologiques. Bulletin de la Société Zoologique de France 113, 381387.Google Scholar
Ollerenshaw, C.B. (1971) Some observations on the epidemiology of fascioliasis in relation to the timing of molluscicide application in the control of the disease. Veterinary Record 88, 152164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Préveraud-Sindou, M., Dreyfuss, G. & Rondelaud, D. (1994) Comparison of the migrations of Fasciola hepatica sporocysts in Lymnaea truncatula and other related snail families. Parasitology Research 80, 342346.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1978) La reconstitution de l'épithélium digestif chez Lymnaea (Galba) truncatula Müller infestée par les formes larvaires de Fasciola hepatica L. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée 53, 255264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1980) Fasciola hepatica L.: les formes larvaires non évolutives ou en dégénérescence chez Lymnaea truncatula Müller. Zeitschrift für Parasitenkunde 62, 95104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1981) Données expérimentales sur la réaction amibocytaire généralisée présentée par Lymnaea truncatula Müller lors de son infestation par Fasciola hepatica L. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée 56, 593606.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1983) Les modifications structurales du rein chez Lymnaea truncatula Müller infestée par Fasciola hepatica L. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée 58, 109116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rondelaud, D., Vignoles, P. & Dreyfuss, G. (2004) Fasciola hepatica: the developmental patterns of redial generations in naturally-infected Galba truncatula. Parasitology Research 94, 183187.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Saint-Guillain, M. (1968) Étude histologique des premiers stades évolutifs de Fasciola hepatica L. Acta Zoologica et Pathologica Antverpiensia 46, 77132.Google Scholar
Sindou, P., Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1990a) Visceral pathology and size of the host snail. Comparative studies in Lymnaea glabra Müller infected by Fasciola hepatica L. Parasitology Research 76, 280281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sindou, P., Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1990b) Fasciola hepatica L.: étude comparative de la pathologie viscérale chez six espèces de limnées soumises dès leur naissance à des infestations monomiracidiennes individuelles. Bulletin de la Société Zoologique de France 115, 331340.Google Scholar
Sindou, P., Cabaret, J. & Rondelaud, D. (1991a) Survival of snails and characteristic lesions of Fasciola hepatica infection in four European species of Lymnaea. Veterinary Parasitology 40, 4758.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sindou, P., Rondelaud, D. & Barthe, D. (1991b) Comparative studies on the lesions of the digestive gland and of the kidney in young and adult snails from four lymnaeid species infected by Fasciola hepatica. Proceedings of the Tenth International Malacological Congress, Tübingen, 1989 255258.Google Scholar
Stat-Itcf 1988 Manuel d'utilisation. 210 pp. Boigneville, Institut technique des céréales et des fourrages, Service des études statistiques.Google Scholar
6
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Parasite development and visceral pathology in Galba truncatula co-infected with Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Parasite development and visceral pathology in Galba truncatula co-infected with Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Parasite development and visceral pathology in Galba truncatula co-infected with Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *