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Nematode assemblages associated with the parthenogenetic lizard Ameivula nativo in six restinga areas along the eastern coast of Brazil

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 October 2017

V.A. Menezes*
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro – UERJ, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
J.C. Mascarenhas
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro – UERJ, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
D. Vrcibradic
Affiliation:
Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro - UNIRIO, Av. Pasteur 458, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
C.F.D. Rocha
Affiliation:
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro – UERJ, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
*
Author for correspondence: V.A. Menezes, E-mail: va.menezes@gmail.com

Abstract

We surveyed the nematode assemblages associated with populations of the parthenogenetic whiptail lizard Ameivula nativo from six coastal restinga areas in eastern Brazil: Setiba, Comboios and Guriri (State of Espirito Santo) and Guaratiba, Prado and Maraú (State of Bahia). A total of five nematode species (Physaloptera retusa, Physalopteroides venancioi, Skrjabinelazia intermedia, Subulura lacertilia and Parapharyngodon sp.) were recorded from the six different populations of A. nativo. There was considerable variation in overall prevalence of infection (1–42%) among study sites, but geographical distance among areas did not influence similarity in the composition of nematode assemblages. Overall intensity of infection was not affected by lizard body size and did not seem to affect host body condition, based on pooled data of all populations. The studied populations of the unisexual A. nativo had relatively low prevalences and intensities of infection compared to some bisexual congeners and to sympatric lizards from other families for which such data are available. We believe that the low richness of the nematode fauna associated with A. nativo, both locally and regionally, may reflect its narrow geographic distribution and the low diversity of habitats it occupies.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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Nematode assemblages associated with the parthenogenetic lizard Ameivula nativo in six restinga areas along the eastern coast of Brazil
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