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Helminth communities of pademelons, Thylogale stigmatica and T. thetis from eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2007

J.E. Griffith
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
I. Beveridge
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
N.B. Chilton
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
P.M. Johnson
Affiliation:
Queensland National Parks and Wildlife Service, Northern Regional Centre, Pallarenda, Queensland 4810, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

Gastrointestinal helminths were collected from pademelons of the genus Thylogale (Marsupialia: Macropodidae) in eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea. Examined were 12 Thylogale stigmatica stigmatica and 13 T. s. wilcoxi, the latter subdivided into eight specimens from the northern limit of their distribution and five from southern areas, all from eastern Queensland, Australia, one T. s. oriomo from Papua New Guinea and ten T. thetis from southeastern Queensland and northern New South Wales, Australia. Six species of cestodes and 40 species of nematodes were found. The helminth community of T. s. stigmatica was similar to that found in northern specimens of T. s. wilcoxi, while differences from the helminth community present in southern T. s. wilcoxi could be accounted for by parasites acquired from sympatric T. thetis. Thylogale thetis harboured a community of helminths distinct from but related to that in T. stigmatica. The evidence suggests that all subspecies of T. stigmatica examined share a common helminth community, but that in areas of sympatry, T. stigmatica and T. thetis share some of their parasites.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Cambridge University Press 2000

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Helminth communities of pademelons, Thylogale stigmatica and T. thetis from eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea
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