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Evaluation of the Baermann–Wetzel method for detecting lungworm larvae in wild ruminants from faecal samples

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2021

T. Carrau
Affiliation:
Parasitología, Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Campus de Excelencia Internacional Regional ‘Campus Mare Nostrum’, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain
C. Martínez-Carrasco
Affiliation:
Parasitología, Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Campus de Excelencia Internacional Regional ‘Campus Mare Nostrum’, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain
M.M. Garijo
Affiliation:
Departamento de Producción y Sanidad Animal, Salud Pública Veterinaria y Ciencia y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Cardenal Herrera-CEU, CEU Universities, C/ Tirant lo Blanc, 7, 46115 Alfara del Patriarca, Valencia, Spain
F. Alonso
Affiliation:
Parasitología, Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Campus de Excelencia Internacional Regional ‘Campus Mare Nostrum’, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain
R. Ruiz de Ybáñez
Affiliation:
Parasitología, Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Campus de Excelencia Internacional Regional ‘Campus Mare Nostrum’, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain
P. Tizzani
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Paolo Braccini 2–10095 Grugliasco, Torino, Italy
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Lungworms can exert a negative impact on wild ruminant fitness; for this reason, the diagnosis of the associated diseases is an important prevention measure. The Baerman–Wetzel technique is the most usual method for the diagnosis of bronchopulmonary nematodes and is based on the active migration and movement of their first-stage larvae. Pulmonary tissue samples are frequently used for the post-mortem diagnosis of these parasites, but this kind of sample is not always available and easy to obtain. Faecal samples represent a more accessible choice for parasite monitoring. This work aimed to evaluate the agreement between the results obtained by the Baermann–Wetzel technique when samples of lung parenchyma or faeces from wild ruminants are used. A good level of agreement as well as a similar sensitivity between the two types of sample were observed, validating the use of faecal samples as a less invasive and cost-effective alternative for the monitoring of lungworm in wild ruminant populations.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Evaluation of the Baermann–Wetzel method for detecting lungworm larvae in wild ruminants from faecal samples
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