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Comparison of adult liver flukes from highland and lowland populations of Bolivian and Spanish sheep

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2007

M.A. Valero
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
M.D. Marcos
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
A.M. Comes
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
M. Sendra
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
S. Mas-Coma
Affiliation:
Departamento de Parasitología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andrés Estellés s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

A morphological study of adult liver flukes and eggs from sheep in a human fascioliasis endemic zone in the Northern Bolivian Altiplano showed that they belong to the species Fasciola hepatica. An exhaustive morphometric comparison with a F. hepatica population from Spanish sheep was made using image analysis and an allometric model: (y2m - y2)]#x002F;y2 = c[(y1m - y1)/y1]b, where y1 = body surface or body length, y2 = one of the measurements analysed, y1m, y2m = maximum values towards which y1 and y2 respectively tend, and c, b = constants. Only slight allometric differences in worms were observed despite the geographic distance between both Spanish and Bolivian sheep populations and the very high altitude of the Bolivian Altiplano.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Cambridge University Press 1999

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References

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