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Rotation of anisotropic particles in Rayleigh–Bénard turbulence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2020

Linfeng Jiang
Affiliation:
Department of Energy and Power Engineering, Center for Combustion Energy, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, International Joint Laboratory on Low Carbon Clean Energy Innovation, Tsinghua University, Beijing100084, PR China
Enrico Calzavarini*
Affiliation:
Univ. Lille, Unité de Mécanique de Lille – J. Boussinesq – UML – ULR 7512, F-59000Lille, France
Chao Sun*
Affiliation:
Department of Energy and Power Engineering, Center for Combustion Energy, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, International Joint Laboratory on Low Carbon Clean Energy Innovation, Tsinghua University, Beijing100084, PR China Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Aerospace Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing100084, PR China
*
Email addresses for correspondence: enrico.calzavarini@polytech-lille.fr, chaosun@tsinghua.edu.cn
Email addresses for correspondence: enrico.calzavarini@polytech-lille.fr, chaosun@tsinghua.edu.cn

Abstract

Inertialess anisotropic particles in a Rayleigh–Bénard turbulent flow show maximal tumbling rates for weakly oblate shapes, in contrast with the universal behaviour observed in developed turbulence where the mean tumbling rate monotonically decreases with the particle aspect ratio. This is due to the concurrent effect of turbulent fluctuations and of a mean shear flow whose intensity, we show, is determined by the kinetic boundary layers. In Rayleigh–Bénard turbulence prolate particles align preferentially with the fluid velocity, while oblate ones orient with the temperature gradient. This analysis elucidates the link between particle angular dynamics and small-scale properties of convective turbulence and has implications for the wider class of sheared turbulent flows.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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