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On the turbulence structure in inert and reacting compressible mixing layers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 November 2007

INGA MAHLE
Affiliation:
Fachgebiet Strömungsmechanik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching, Germany
HOLGER FOYSI
Affiliation:
UC San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
SUTANU SARKAR
Affiliation:
UC San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
RAINER FRIEDRICH
Affiliation:
Fachgebiet Strömungsmechanik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching, Germany

Abstract

Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate effects of heat release and compressibility on mixing-layer turbulence during a period of self-similarity. Temporally evolving mixing layers are analysed at convective Mach numbers between 0.15 and 1.1 and in a Reynolds number range of 15000 to 35000 based on vorticity thickness. The turbulence inhibiting effects of heat release are traced back to mean density variations using an analysis of the fluctuating pressure field based on a Green's function.

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Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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References

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