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Note on the induced Lagrangian drift and added-mass of a vortex

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 January 2006

JOHN O. DABIRI
Affiliation:
Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories & Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA

Abstract

Darwin (1953) introduced a simple heuristic that relates the Lagrangian fluid drift induced by a solid body propagating in irrotational flow to its virtual- or added-mass. The force required to accelerate the solid body must also overcome this added-mass. An extension of Darwin's (1953) method to the case of vortices propagating in a real fluid is described here. Experiments are conducted to demonstrate the existence of an added-mass effect during uni-directional vortex motion, which is analogous to the effect of solid bodies in potential flow. The definition of the vortex added-mass coefficient is modified from the solid body case to account for entrainment of ambient fluid by the vortex. This modified coefficient for propagating vortices is shown to be equal in magnitude to the classical coefficient for a solid body of equivalent boundary geometry. An implication of these results is that the vortex added-mass concept can be used as a surrogate for the velocity potential, in order to facilitate calculations of the pressure contribution to forces required to set fluid into unsteady vortical motion. Application of these results to unsteady wake analyses and fluid–structure interactions such as vortex-induced vibrations is suggested.

Type
Papers
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press

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