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Levitation of a drop over a moving surface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 September 2013

Henri Lhuissier
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, J.M. Burgers Center for Fluid Dynamics, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
Yoshiyuki Tagawa
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, J.M. Burgers Center for Fluid Dynamics, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakacho, Koganei-city, Tokyo, Japan
Tuan Tran
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, J.M. Burgers Center for Fluid Dynamics, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
Chao Sun
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, J.M. Burgers Center for Fluid Dynamics, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands

Abstract

We investigate the levitation of a drop gently deposited onto the inner wall of a rotating hollow cylinder. For a sufficiently large velocity of the wall, the drop steadily levitates over a thin air film and reaches a stable angular position in the cylinder, where the drag and lift balance the weight of the drop. Interferometric measurements yield the three-dimensional (3D) air film thickness under the drop and reveal the asymmetry of the profile along the direction of the wall motion. A two-dimensional (2D) model is presented which explains the levitation mechanism, captures the main characteristics of the air film shape and predicts two asymptotic regimes for the film thickness ${h}_{0} $ : for large drops ${h}_{0} \sim {\mathit{Ca}}^{2/ 3} { \kappa }_{b}^{- 1} $ , as in the Bretherton problem, where $\mathit{Ca}$ is the capillary number based on the air viscosity and ${\kappa }_{b} $ is the curvature at the bottom of the drop; for small drops ${h}_{0} \sim {\mathit{Ca}}^{4/ 5} {(a{\kappa }_{b} )}^{4/ 5} { \kappa }_{b}^{- 1} $ , where $a$ is the capillary length.

Type
Rapids
Copyright
©2013 Cambridge University Press 

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