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Inviscid spatial stability of a three-dimensional compressible mixing layer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2006

C. E. Grosch
Affiliation:
Department of Oceanography and Department of Computer Science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA
T. L. Jackson
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529: USA

Abstract

We present the results of a study of the inviscid spatial stability of a parallel three-dimensional compressible mixing layer. The parameters of this study are the Mach number of the fast stream, the ratio of the speed of the slow stream to that of the fast stream, the ratio of the temperature of the slow stream to that of the fast stream, the direction of the crossflow in the fast stream, the frequency, and the direction of propagation of the disturbance wave. Stability characteristics of the flow as a function of these parameters are given. Certain theoretical results are presented which show the interrelations between these parameters and their effects on the stability characteristics. In particular, the three-dimensional stability problem for a three-dimensional mixing layer at Mach zero can be transformed to a two-dimensional stability problem for an equivalent two-dimensional mean flow. There exists a one-parameter family of curves such that for any given direction of mean flow and of wave propagation one can apply this transformation and obtain the growth rate from the universal curves. For supersonic couvective Mach numbers, certain combinations of crossflow angle and propagation angle of the disturbance can increase the growth rates by a factor of about two. and thus enhance mixing.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1991 Cambridge University Press

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References

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