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Growth and translation of a liquid-vapour compound drop in a second liquid. Part 2. Heat transfer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2006

S. T. Vuong
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453, USA
S. S. Sadhal
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453, USA

Abstract

The present work is a comprehensive theoretical study of the heat transfer associated with a 3-singlet compound drop that is growing because of change of phase. The geometry is the same as in Part 1, i.e. a vapour bubble partially surrounded by its own liquid in another immiscible liquid. The attempt here is to gain fundamental understanding of the transport processes that take place in connection with direct-contact heat exchange. The fluid dynamics associated with its growth and translation is treated in Part 1. Here, that flow field solution is used to obtain the temperature field and hence the evaporation rate. The energy equation for the system consisting of a single compound drop is solved numerically by finite-difference methods. The results give the complete time history of evaporation of the drop. In addition, useful quantities such as the Nusselt number are given and compared with existing experimental data. Most of the results have good agreement with experimental data.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1989 Cambridge University Press

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References

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