Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-q7wkk Total loading time: 0.181 Render date: 2022-06-29T11:21:51.355Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The forced response of choked nozzles and supersonic diffusers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 August 2007

WILLIAM H. MOASE
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Melbourne, VIC, 3010, Australia
MICHAEL J. BREAR
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Melbourne, VIC, 3010, Australia
CHRIS MANZIE
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Melbourne, VIC, 3010, Australia

Abstract

The response of choked nozzles and supersonic diffusers to one-dimensional flow perturbations is investigated. Following previous arguments in the literature, small flow perturbations in a duct of spatially linear steady velocity distribution are determined by solution of a hyper-geometric differential equation. A set of boundary conditions is then developed that extends the existing work to a nozzle of arbitrary geometry. This analysis accommodates the motion of a plane shock wave and makes no assumption about the nozzle compactness. Numerical simulations of the unsteady, quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations are performed to validate this analysis and also to indicate the conditions under which the perturbations remain approximately linear.

The nonlinear response of compact choked nozzles and supersonic diffusers is also investigated. Simple analyses are performed to determine the reflected and transmitted waveforms, as well as conditions for unchoke, ‘over-choke’ and unstart. This analysis is also supported with results from numerical simulations of the Euler equations.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Culick, F. E. C. & Rogers, T. 1983 The response of normal shocks in diffusers. AIAA J. 21, 13821390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dowling, A. P. & Hubbard, S. 2000 Instablity in lean premixed combusters. Proc. Inst. Mech. Engrs A 214, 317332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kim, J. W. & Lee, D. J. 2001 Adaptive nonlinear artificial dissipation model for computational aeroacoustics. AIAA J. 39, 810818.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marble, F. E. & Candel, S. M. 1977 Acoustic disturbance from gas non-uniformities convected through a nozzle. J. Sound Vib. 55, 225243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mayer, D. W. & Paynter, G. C. 1995 Prediction of supersonic inlet unstart caused by freestream disturbances. AIAA J. 33, 266275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Poinsot, T. J. & Lele, S. K. 1992 Boundary conditions for direct simulation of compressible viscous flows. J. Comput. Phys. 101, 104129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rein, M., Grabitz, G. & Meier, G. E. A. 1988 Non-linear wave propagation in transonic nozzle flows. J. Sound Vib. 122, 331346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stow, S. R., Dowling, A. P. & Hynes, T. P. 2002 Reflection of circumferential modes in a choked nozzle. J. Fluid Mech. 467, 215239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tam, C. K. W. & Webb, J. C. 1993 Dispersion-relation-preserving finite difference schemes for computational acoustics. J. Comput. Phys. 107, 262281.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tsien, H. S. 1952 The transfer functions of rocket nozzles. Am. Rocket Soc. J. 22, 139143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
73
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The forced response of choked nozzles and supersonic diffusers
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The forced response of choked nozzles and supersonic diffusers
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The forced response of choked nozzles and supersonic diffusers
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *