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Dual channels of helicity cascade in turbulent flows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2020

Zheng Yan
Affiliation:
LHD, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190, PR China School of Engineering Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100049, PR China
Xinliang Li
Affiliation:
LHD, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190, PR China School of Engineering Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100049, PR China
Changping Yu
Affiliation:
LHD, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190, PR China School of Engineering Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100049, PR China
Jianchun Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong518055, PR China
Shiyi Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong518055, PR China State Key Laboratory of Turbulence and Complex Systems, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing100871, PR China
Corresponding
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Abstract

Helicity, as one of only two inviscid invariants in three-dimensional turbulence, plays an important role in the generation and evolution of turbulent flows. Through theoretical analyses, we find that there are two channels in the helicity cascade process, which differs dramatically from the traditional viewpoint. In this paper, we have conducted important research on the newly proposed dual-channel helicity cascade theory, including vortex dynamic processes, intermittent discrepancies, tensor geometries, etc. The first channel mainly originates from the vortex twisting process, and the second channel mainly originates from the vortex stretching process. Antisymmetric tensors are introduced to the derivations of dual-channel helicity cascade theory, and a complex rotation frame leads to a higher helicity transfer efficiency. By analysing data from direct numerical simulations of typical turbulent flows, we find that these two channels behave differently. The ensemble averages of helicity flux in different channels are equal in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, while they are different in other types of turbulent flows. The intermittency of the second channel is stronger than that of the first channel. In addition, we find a novel mechanism of hindered or even inverse energy cascades, which could be attributed to the second-channel helicity flux.

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JFM Rapids
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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