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Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer laden with particles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2018

Dong Li
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, PR China
Kun Luo*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, PR China
Jianren Fan
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, PR China
*
Email address for correspondence: zjulk@zju.edu.cn

Abstract

Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows in a spatially developing turbulent thermal boundary layer over an isothermally heated wall have been performed with realistic fully developed turbulent inflow boundary conditions. To the authors’ best knowledge, this is the first time the effects of inertial solid particles on turbulent flow and heat transfer in a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer have been investigated, using a two-way coupled Eulerian–Lagrangian method. Results indicate that the presence of particles increases the mean streamwise velocity and temperature gradients of the fluid in the near-wall region. As a result, the skin-friction drag and heat transfer are significantly enhanced in the particle-laden flows with respect to the single-phase flow. The near-wall sweep and ejection motions are suppressed by the particles and hence the Reynolds shear stress and wall-normal turbulent heat flux are attenuated, which leads to reductions in the production of the turbulent kinetic energy and temperature fluctuations. In addition, the coherence and spacing of the near-wall velocity and temperature streaky structures are distinctly increased, while the turbulent vortical structures appear to be disorganized under the effect of the particles. Moreover, the intensity of the streamwise vortices decreases monotonically with increasing particle inertia.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© 2018 Cambridge University Press 

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