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Algebraic disturbance growth by interaction of Orr and lift-up mechanisms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2017

M. J. Philipp Hack
Affiliation:
Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Parviz Moin
Affiliation:
Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Algebraic disturbance growth in spatially developing boundary-layer flows is investigated using an optimization approach. The methodology builds on the framework of the parabolized stability equations and avoids some of the limitations associated with adjoint-based schemes. In the Blasius boundary layer, non-parallel effects are shown to significantly enhance the energy gain due to algebraic growth mechanisms. In contrast to parallel flow, the most energetic perturbations have finite frequency and are generated by the simultaneous activity of the Orr and lift-up mechanisms. The highest amplification occurs in a limited region of the parameter space that is characterized by a linear relation between the wavenumber and frequency of the disturbances. The frequency of the most highly amplified perturbations decreases with Reynolds number. Adverse streamwise pressure gradient further enhances the amplification of disturbances while preserving the linear trend between the wavenumber and frequency of the most energetic perturbations.

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© 2017 Cambridge University Press 

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