Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-rq6d8 Total loading time: 0.302 Render date: 2021-09-27T19:28:42.851Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Preconception nutrition: building advocacy and social movements to stimulate action

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 May 2020

Christina Vogel*
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK National Institute for Health Research Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK
Natasha Kriznik
Affiliation:
Birmingham City University, Birmingham B5 5JU, UK
Judith Stephenson
Affiliation:
Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Institute for Womenʼs Health, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London, London WC1E 6AU, UK
Mary Barker
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK National Institute for Health Research Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK
*
Address for correspondence: Christina Vogel, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. Email: cv@mrc.soton.ac.uk

Abstract

Action to improve preconception nutrition is a collective, societal responsibility. We believe that the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) society is ideally placed to facilitate the development of a global agenda for preconception nutrition which recognises the societal importance of nutrition for young women and men, and supports them in optimising their nutritional status for the benefit of the next generation. In this paper, we outline four key actions that can be taken by the members of DOHaDʼs international society located across 67 countries, and nine regional societies, to demonstrate this leadership role. The recommended actions to place preconception nutrition at the top of national and regional agendas include (i) continuing to build the scientific evidence, (ii) monitoring of progress made by governments and commercial companies, (iii) developing advocacy coalitions that unite individuals and organisations around common policy options and (iv) working with partners to develop an emotive and empowering preconception nutrition awareness campaign. Collectively, these actions hold the potential to develop into a preconception nutrition social movement to invoke high-level government support and across-sector policy action, while raising public demand for action and engaging corporate actors.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Stephenson, J, Heslehurst, N, Hall, J, et al. Before the beginning: nutrition and lifestyle in the preconception period and its importance for future health. Lancet. 2018; 391(10132), 18301841.Google ScholarPubMed
Fleming, TP, Watkins, AJ, Velazquez, MA, et al. Origins of lifetime health around the time of conception: causes and consequences. Lancet. 2018; 391(10132), 18421852.Google Scholar
Barker, M, Dombrowski, SU, Colbourn, T, et al. Intervention strategies to improve nutrition and health behaviours before conception. Lancet. 2018; 391(10132), 18531864.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barker, D, Barker, M, Fleming, T, Lampl, M. Developmental biology: support mothers to secure future public health. Nature. 2013; 504(7479), 209211.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Davies, S. Annual Report of the Chief Medical Officer, 2014, The Health of the 51%: Women. London, UK, 2015.Google Scholar
Public Health England. Preconception Care: Making the Case. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/preconception-care-making-the-case (accessed 09/11/2018).Google Scholar
NHS England. The NHS Long Term Plan, 2019.Google Scholar
Floyd, RL, Johnson, KA, Owens, JR, Verbiest, S, Moore, CA, Boyle, C. A national action plan for promoting preconception health and health care in the United States (2012–2014). J Womenʼs Health (2002). 2013; 22(10), 797802.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vogel, C, Ntani, G, Inskip, H, et al. Education and the relationship between supermarket environment and diet. Am J Prev Med. 2016; 51(2), e27e34.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frey, KA, Navarro, SM, Kotelchuck, M, Lu, MC. The clinical content of preconception care: preconception care for men. Am J Obstetrics Gynecol. 2008; 199(6), S389S95.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
World Health Organisation. Meeting to develop a global consensus on preconception care to reduce maternal and childhood mortality and morbidity. Geneva, Switzerland, 2013.Google Scholar
Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations, World Health Organisation. Second International Conference on Nutrition: Rome Declaration on Nutrition Rome, 2014.Google Scholar
World Health Organisation. Comprehensive Implementation Plan on Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition. Geneva, Switzerland, 2014.Google Scholar
World Health Organisation. Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable diseases 2013–2020, Geneva: World Helth Organisation, 2013.Google Scholar
World Health Organisation. Report of the Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity. Geneva, Swtizerland, 2016.Google Scholar
United Nations Secretary-General. Global Strategy for Womenʼs, Childrenʼs and Adolescentʼs Health (2016–2030). New York, 2015.Google Scholar
United Nations. Sustainable Development Goals. https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/ (accessed 09/11/2018).Google Scholar
Stephenson, J, Vogel, C, Hall, J, et al. Preconception health in England: a proposal for annual reporting with core metrics. Lancet. 2019; 393(10187), 22622271.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McKerracher, L, Moffat, T, Barker, M, Williams, D, Sloboda, DM. Translating the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease concept to improve the nutritional environment for our next generations: a call for a reflexive, positive, multi-level approach. J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2019; 10(4), 420428.Google Scholar
United Nations Childrenʼs Fund. UNICEFʼs Approach to Scaling Up Nutrition For Mothers and Their Children. New York, 2015.Google Scholar
Mason, E, Chandra-Mouli, V, Baltag, V, Christiansen, C, Lassi, ZS, Bhutta, ZA. Preconception care: advancing from ‘important to do and can be done’ to ‘is being done and is making a difference’. Reprod Health. 2014; (11 Suppl 3), S8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huang, TT, Cawley, JH, Ashe, M, et al. Mobilisation of public support for policy actions to prevent obesity. Lancet. 2015; 385(9985), 24222431.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease. The Cape Town Manifesto: A healthy start builds a bright future, 2015.Google Scholar
Weible, C, Sabatier, P. A guide to the advocacy coalition framework. In Handbook of Public Policy Analysis: Theory, Political and Methods (eds. Fischer, F, Miller, G, Sidney, M), 2007; Taylor and Francis Group, Florida, United States.Google Scholar
Acosta, AM. Examining the poiltical, institutional and governance aspects of delivering a national multi-sectoral response to reduce maternal and child malnutrition. Analysing nutrition governance: Brazil country report. Brighton, 2011.Google Scholar
Monteiro, CA, Benicio, MH, Conde, WL, et al. Narrowing socioeconomic inequality in child stunting: the Brazilian experience, 1974–2007. Bull World Health Organ. 2010; 88(4), 305311.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Victora, CG, Aquino, EM, do Carmo Leal, M, Monteiro, CA, Barros, FC, Szwarcwald, CL. Maternal and child health in Brazil: progress and challenges. Lancet. 2011; 377(9780), 18631876.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nisbett, N, Barnett, I. Explaining the reduction in child undernutrition in the Indian state of Maharashtra between 2006 and 2012: an analysis of the policy processes. Food Policy. 2017; 70, 2739.Google Scholar
World Health Organisation. Global Nutrition Targets 2025: Stunting Policy Brief. Geneva, 2014.Google Scholar
Yach, D, McKee, M, Lopez, AD, Novotny, T. Improving diet and physical activity: 12 lessons from controlling tobacco smoking. BMJ. 2005; 330(7496), 898900.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lorenc, T, Petticrew, M, Welch, V, Tugwell, P. What types of interventions generate inequalities? Evidence from systematic reviews. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013; 67(2), 190193.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kriznik, NM, Kinmonth, AL, Ling, T, Kelly, MP. Moving beyond individual choice in policies to reduce health inequalities: the integration of dynamic with individual explanations. J Public Health (Oxf). 2018; 40(4), 764775.Google ScholarPubMed
Shove, E, Pantzar, M, Watson, MF. The Dynamics of Social Practice: Everyday Life and How it Changes, 2012. London: SAGE Publications Ltd.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Olander, EK, Darwin, ZJ, Atkinson, L, Smith, DM, Gardner, B. Beyond the ‘teachable moment’ - A conceptual analysis of womenʼs perinatal behaviour change. Women Birth. 2016; 29(3), e67e71.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Phelan, S. Pregnancy: a “teachable moment” for weight control and obesity prevention. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010; 202(2), 135.e1135.e8.Google ScholarPubMed
Bacchi, C. Analysing Policy: Whatʼs the Problem Represented to be?, 2009. Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest, N.S.W, Australia.Google Scholar
Twigg, J. The body in social policy: mapping a territory. J Soc Policy. 2002; 31, 421439.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ballantyne, R, Warren, A, Nobbs, K. The evolution of brand choice. J Brand Manag. 2006; 13(4), 339352.Google Scholar
Ayala, A, Meier, BM. A human rights approach to the health implications of food and nutrition insecurity. Public Health Rev. 2017; 38, 10.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frayne, DJ, Verbiest, S, Chelmow, D, et al. Health care system measures to advance preconception wellness: consensus recommendations of the clinical workgroup of the national preconception health and health care initiative. Obstetrics Gynecol. 2016; 127(5), 863872.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Preconception nutrition: building advocacy and social movements to stimulate action
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Preconception nutrition: building advocacy and social movements to stimulate action
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Preconception nutrition: building advocacy and social movements to stimulate action
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *