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Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: Impact of environmental dust exposure in modulating microbiome and its association with non-communicable diseases

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2020

Delicia Shu-Qin Ooi
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore
Cheryl Pei-Ting Tan
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore
Michelle Jia-Yu Tay
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore
Siong Gim Ong
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore
Elizabeth Huiwen Tham
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore
Kewin Tien Ho Siah
Affiliation:
Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, University Medicine Cluster, National University Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
Johan Gunnar Eriksson
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, Singapore University of Helsinki, and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland
Keith M. Godfrey
Affiliation:
NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, Southampton, UK
Lynette Pei-Chi Shek
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Khoo Teck Puat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, Singapore
Evelyn Xiu-Ling Loo*
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, Singapore
*
Address for correspondence: Evelyn Xiu-Ling Loo, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Brenner Centre for Molecular Medicine, 30 Medical Drive, Singapore 117609, Singapore. E-mail: evelyn_loo@sics.a-star.edu.sg

Abstract

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including obesity, diabetes, and allergy are chronic, multi-factorial conditions that are affected by both genetic and environmental factors. Over the last decade, the microbiome has emerged as a possible contributor to the pathogenesis of NCDs. Microbiome profiles were altered in patients with NCDs, and shift in microbial communities was associated with improvement in these health conditions. Since the genetic component of these diseases cannot be altered, the ability to manipulate the microbiome holds great promise for design of novel therapies in the prevention and treatment of NCDs. Together, the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease concept and the microbial hypothesis propose that early life exposure to environmental stimuli will alter the development and composition of the human microbiome, resulting in health consequences. Recent studies indicated that the environment we are exposed to in early life is instrumental in shaping robust immune development, possibly through modulation of the human microbiome (skin, airway, and gut). Despite much research into human microbiome, the origin of their constituent microbiota remains unclear. Dust (also known as particulate matter) is a key determinant of poor air quality in the modern urban environment. It is ubiquitous and serves as a major source and reservoir of microbial communities that modulates the human microbiome, contributing to health and disease. There are evidence that reported significant associations between environmental dust and NCDs. In this review, we will focus on the impact of dust exposure in shaping the human microbiome and its possible contribution to the development of NCDs.

Type
Review
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2020

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