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Cardiometabolic disease risk among siblings of patients with major depressive disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2020

Jia-Ru Li
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Shih-Jen Tsai
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Ya-Mei Bai
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Ju-Wei Hsu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Kai-Lin Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Tung-Ping Su
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Cheng-Ta Li
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Wei-Chen Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Tzeng-Ji Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
Tai-Long Pan*
Affiliation:
School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan Liver Research Center, Division of Hepatology, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan
Mu-Hong Chen*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
*
Address for correspondence: Mu-Hong Chen, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, No. 201, Shih-Pai Road, Sec. 2, 11217, Taipei, Taiwan. Tel.: 886-2-28344012; Fax: 886-2-28344012. Email: kremer7119@gmail.com Tai-Long Pan, PhD, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Tel.: 886-2-28344012; Fax: 886-2-28344012. Email: pan@mail.cgu.edu.tw
Address for correspondence: Mu-Hong Chen, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, No. 201, Shih-Pai Road, Sec. 2, 11217, Taipei, Taiwan. Tel.: 886-2-28344012; Fax: 886-2-28344012. Email: kremer7119@gmail.com Tai-Long Pan, PhD, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Tel.: 886-2-28344012; Fax: 886-2-28344012. Email: pan@mail.cgu.edu.tw

Abstract

Studies have suggested an association between metabolic and cerebrocardiovascular diseases and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the risk of metabolic and cerebrocardiovascular diseases in the unaffected siblings of patients with MDD remains uncertain. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 22,438 unaffected siblings of patients with MDD and 89,752 age-/sex-matched controls were selected and followed up from 1996 to the end of 2011. Individuals who developed metabolic and cerebrocardiovascular diseases during the follow-up period were identified. Compared with the controls, the unaffected siblings of patients with MDD had a higher prevalence of metabolic diseases, such as hypertension (5.0% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.007), dyslipidemia (5.6% vs. 4.8%, p < 0.001), and obesity (1.7% vs. 1.5%, p = 0.028), and cerebrocardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic stroke (0.6% vs. 0.4%, p < 0.005) and ischemic heart disease (2.1% vs. 1.7%, p < 0.001). Logistic regression analyses revealed that the unaffected siblings of patients with MDD were more likely to develop hypertension, dyslipidemia, ischemic stroke, and ischemic heart diseases during the follow-up period than the controls. Our study revealed a familial coaggregation between MDD and metabolic and cerebrocardiovascular diseases. Additional studies are required to investigate the shared pathophysiology of MDD and metabolic and cerebrocardiovascular diseases.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press in association with International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

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