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Were Jews in interwar Poland more educated?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2020

Ran Abramitzky*
Affiliation:
Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA NBER, Cambridge, MA, USA
Hanna Halaburda
Affiliation:
NYU Stern School of Business, New York, NY, USA
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author. E-mail: ranabr@stanford.edu
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Abstract

In the context of interwar Poland, we find that Jews tended to be more literate than non-Jews, but show that this finding is driven by a composition effect. In particular, most Jews lived in cities and most non-Jews lived in rural areas, and people in cities were more educated than people in villages regardless of their religion. The case of interwar Poland illustrates that the Jewish relative education advantage depends on the historical and institutional contexts.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Université catholique de Louvain 2020

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Footnotes

First version: 2005.

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