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Gendered migration responses to drought in Malawi

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2021

Luis G. Becerra-Valbuena
Affiliation:
Paris School of Economics, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, 48 Boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris Cedex 14, France
Katrin Millock*
Affiliation:
CNRS, Paris School of Economics, Paris, France
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: millock@univ-paris1.fr
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Abstract

Migration is a common means of adaptation to weather shocks. Previous research has identified heterogeneous effects according to age, sex, and wealth, but little is still known about how marriage-related institutions affect such migration. Relying on a quasi-experimental identification strategy, we analyze marriage- and work-related migration in Malawi following large droughts, separating the effects for female and male migrants according to different age groups. The analysis based on stated motives of migration reveals marginal decreases in marriage-related migration among girls, but increases in marriage-related migration within districts for women in older age groups. We also find large increases in work-related between-district migration for boys, and to a smaller extent also for girls following severe drought. The results add to the evidence of the potentially adverse effects of migration as a coping mechanism following drought when other means of insurance do not exist.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Université catholique de Louvain 2021

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