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Yield gap in milk production is considerable in Indian Himalayan state of Meghalaya

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2021

Evans Kemboi
Affiliation:
School of Social Sciences, College of Post Graduate Studies in Agricultural Sciences, Central Agricultural University, Imphal, Umiam, Meghalaya 793103, India
S. M. Feroze
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture, Central Agricultural University, Imphal, Iroisemba, Manipur 795004, India
Ram Singh
Affiliation:
School of Social Sciences, College of Post Graduate Studies in Agricultural Sciences, Central Agricultural University, Imphal, Umiam, Meghalaya 793103, India
Jabir Ahmed
Affiliation:
School of Social Sciences, College of Post Graduate Studies in Agricultural Sciences, Central Agricultural University, Imphal, Umiam, Meghalaya 793103, India
Hehlangki Tyngkan
Affiliation:
School of Social Sciences, College of Post Graduate Studies in Agricultural Sciences, Central Agricultural University, Imphal, Umiam, Meghalaya 793103, India
Corresponding
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Abstract

Yield gaps in milk production are here defined as the differentials between the actual yield obtained by the dairy farmer and the potential farm yield (production achieved by the top 10% of farmers: Gap 2) as well as the differential between this potential farm yield and the yield registered in the research stations (Gap 1). Assessment of yield gaps provides valuable information on potential production enhancement and drivers behind yield gaps. Milk production can be increased by narrowing the predominant large yield gaps in resource-poor smallholder farming system. Hence, this study assessed the milk yield gap and factors affecting the yield gap in Ri-Bhoi district of Meghalaya, a state located in the north-eastern Himalayan region of India. This research paper provides a scope for exploring the possibilities for improving dairy production in the state as well as contributing to literature through incorporating crucial determinants responsible for milk yield gap. A sample of 81 respondents was drawn purposely from two blocks of the district. The results indicated that the average number of cattle per household was 9.38 in standard animal units. The total yield gap was estimated at 6.20 l (91.06%) per day, composed of 0.80 l (11.76%) per day of yield gap I and 5.40 l (79.30%) per day of yield gap II. This demonstrates that the top performing farms were achieving a production level not dissimilar to that obtained on the research stations, but many were doing far less well. The size of cattle shed, dairy farming experience, concentrate price and human labour were the important determinants of the yield gap. Hence, encouraging the right stocking density of cattle, training on the preparations of home-made concentrates, access to cheap and quality concentrates, incorporating training and experience sharing on proper dairy management practices and use of technology could benefit the dairy farmers of the region.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press of Hannah Dairy Research Foundation

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