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Proteolysis detection in milk: I. Interpretation of tyrosine value data for raw milk supplies in relation to natural variation, bacterial counts and other factors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

H. S. Juffs
Affiliation:
Otto Madsen Dairy Research Laboratory, Hamilton 4007, Brisbane, Australia

Summary

A method for detection of proteolysis in milk was evaluated. Amino acids and peptides soluble in trichloroacetic acid were estimated by the Lowry–Folin procedure with expression of results in terms of colour yield equivalent to that of tyrosine (the ‘tyrosine value’ (TV)). Some variables and alternatives in the method of estimation were investigated.

TVs for milk freshly drawn from individual cows were extremely varied (0·31–0·92 mg/ml). TVs for samples of refrigerated milk from daily supply farms were in the range 0·40–0·58 mg/ml; no relationships between TV and bacterial counts were evident with these samples. With bulk refrigerated raw milk supplied to Brisbane for liquid consumption from country depots and local farms equipped with bulk vats, significant positive relationships were found between TV and total bacterial count (TBC) for supplies from some sources, but in no instance was a significant relationship found between TV and psychrotroph or proteolytic psychrotroph count. Significant positive relationships were found between TV of bulk milk supplies from some sources and atmospheric temperature, and between TBC of the supplies and atmospheric temperature. The significance of these various relationships for bulk milks is discussed.

Natural variation in TV imposed limitations on reliability of the method to provide an index of proteolysis; in general the results indicated that its application was restricted to bulk milk cold-stored for at least 3 days.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1973

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References

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