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Production and chemical composition of two dehydrated fermented dairy products based on cow or goat milk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 February 2016

Jorge Moreno-Fernández
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology (Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Universitario de Cartuja), Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Javier Díaz-Castro
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology (Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Universitario de Cartuja), Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Maria J. M. Alférez
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology (Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Universitario de Cartuja), Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Silvia Hijano
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology (Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Universitario de Cartuja), Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Teresa Nestares
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology (Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Universitario de Cartuja), Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Inmaculada López-Aliaga
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology (Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Universitario de Cartuja), Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the main macro and micronutrients including proteins, fat, minerals and vitamins in cow and goat dehydrated fermented milks. Fermented goat milk had higher protein and lower ash content. All amino acids (except for Ala), were higher in fermented goat milk than in fermented cow milk. Except for the values of C11:0, C13:0, C16:0, C18:0, C20:5, C22:5 and the total quantity of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, all the other fatty acid studied were significantly different in both fermented milks. Ca, Mg, Zn, Fe, Cu and Se were higher in fermented goat milk. Fermented goat milk had lower amounts of folic acid, vitamin E and C, and higher values of vitamin A, D3, B6 and B12. The current study demonstrates the better nutritional characteristics of fermented goat milk, suggesting a potential role of this dairy product as a high nutritional value food.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2016 

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