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Growth and proteinase production in Pseudomonas spp. cultivated under various conditions of temperature and nutrition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

H. S. Juffs
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University of Queensland, Medical School, Herston 4006, Brisbane, Australia
A. C. Hayward
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University of Queensland, Medical School, Herston 4006, Brisbane, Australia
H. W. Doelle
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University of Queensland, Medical School, Herston 4006, Brisbane, Australia

Summary

A study was made of the formation of the extracellular proteolytic enzymes during the growth cycle of several species of Pseudomonas cultivated under different conditions of temperature and nutrition. Proteolytic activity was not proportional to growth. Expressed per unit of cell dry weight, the proteolytic activity showed a peak in the early logarithmic phase which was greater in cultures grown at 3 than at 28°C. Proteolytic enzyme was not formed in the absence of organic nitrogen. Of 16 organisms studied, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 10145 was the most prolific producer of proteolytic enzyme.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1968

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