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Evaluating the technological properties of lactic acid bacteria in Wagyu cattle milk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2021

Harutoshi Tsuda
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture and Life Science, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Japan Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan
Kana Kodama
Affiliation:
Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This paper reveals the technological properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from raw milk (colostrum and mature milk) of Wagyu cattle raised in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. Isolates were identified based on their physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Streptococcus lutetiensis and Lactobacillus plantarum showed high acid and diacetyl-acetoin production in milk after 24 h of incubation at 40 and 30°C, respectively. These strains are thought to have potential for use as starter cultures and adjunct cultures for fermented dairy products.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Hannah Dairy Research Foundation

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