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Compositional, microbiological, biochemical, volatile profile and sensory characterization of four Italian semi-hard goats' cheeses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2007

Raffaella Di Cagno
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Protezione delle Piante e Microbiologia Applicata, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy
R Evan Miracle
Affiliation:
Southeast Dairy Foods Research Center, Department of Food Science, North Caroline State University, Raleigh, NCUSA
Maria De Angelis
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Protezione delle Piante e Microbiologia Applicata, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy
Fabio Minervini
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Protezione delle Piante e Microbiologia Applicata, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy
Carlo G Rizzello
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Protezione delle Piante e Microbiologia Applicata, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy
Mary Anne Drake
Affiliation:
Southeast Dairy Foods Research Center, Department of Food Science, North Caroline State University, Raleigh, NCUSA
Patrick F Fox
Affiliation:
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
Marco Gobbetti
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Protezione delle Piante e Microbiologia Applicata, Università degli Studi di Bari, Italy
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Four semi-hard Italian goats' milk cheeses, Flor di Capra (FC), Caprino di Cavalese (CC), Caprino di Valsassina (CV) and Capritilla (C), were compared for compositional, microbiological, biochemical, volatile profile and sensory characteristics. Mean values for the gross composition in part differed between cheeses. At the end of ripening, cheeses contained 7·98−8·51 log10 cfu/g of non-starter lactic acid bacteria. Lactobacillus paracasei, Lb. casei and Lb. plantarum were dominant in almost all cheeses. As shown by the Principal Component Analysis of RP-FPLC data for the pH 4·6-soluble fractions and by the determination of free amino acids, secondary proteolysis of CC and CV mainly differed from the other two cheeses. A total of 72 volatile components were identified by steam distillation-extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Free fatty acids and esters qualitatively and quantitatively differentiated the profile of CV and CC, respectively. The lowest concentrations of volatile components characterized FC. Descriptive sensory analysis using 17 flavour attributes was carried out by a trained panel. Different flavour attributes distinguished the four goats' cheeses and relationships were found with volatile components, biochemical characteristics and technology.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 2007

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