Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-zm8ws Total loading time: 0.263 Render date: 2021-06-13T06:40:32.265Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Comparison of a simple butterfat agar medium with other media used for isolation and enumeration of lipolytic bacteria from dairy products

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

Arthur W. Shelley
Affiliation:
Queensland Food Research Laboratories, Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Hamilton, Queensland 4007, Australia
Hilton C. Deeth
Affiliation:
Queensland Food Research Laboratories, Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Hamilton, Queensland 4007, Australia
Ian C. MacRae
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4067, Australia

Summary

A nutrient agar medium containing 0·1 % of a low melting point fraction of butterfat was shown to be suitable for detection, enumeration and isolation of lipolytic bacteria from milk. Bacterial growth was not inhibited by the butterfat and lipolytic reactions were clearly visible and easily interpreted. Lipolytic counts on the butterfat agar compared favourably with lipolytic counts obtained with other commonly used media.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1987

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Alford, J. A. 1976 Lipolytic microorganisms. In Compendium of Methods for the Microbiological Examination of Foods pp. 184189 (Ed. Speck, M. L.). Washington DC.: American Public Health AssociationGoogle Scholar
Anderson, J. A. 1934 An agar plate method for the detection and enumeration of lipolytic microorganisms. Journal of Bacteriology 27 69Google Scholar
Berry, J. A. 1933 Detection of microbial lipase by copper soap formation. Journal of Bacteriology 25 433434Google ScholarPubMed
British Standards Institution 1940 British standard methods for the microbiological examination of butter: lipolytic organisms. BS 895. B.2Google Scholar
British Standards Institution 1968 Methods of microbiological examination for dairy purposes: Colony count technique for lipolytic organisms. BS 4285.1.10Google Scholar
Brockeriioff, H. & Jensen, G. J. 1974 Lipases. In Lipolytic Enzymes pp. 2534New York: Academic PressCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cogan, T. M. 1977 A review of the heat resistant lipases and proteinases and the quality of dairy products. Irish Journal of Food Science and Technology 1 95105Google Scholar
Cousin, M. A. 1982 Presence and activity of psychrotrophic microorganisms in milk and dairy products: a review. Journal of Food Protection 45 172207CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deeth, H. C. & Fitz-Gerald, C. H. 1983 Lipolytic enzymes and hydrolytic rancidity in milk and milk products. In Developments in Dairy Chemistry-2: Lipids pp. 195239. (Ed. Fox, P. F.) London: Applied Science PublishersCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fryer, T. F., Lawrence, R. C. & Reiter, B. 1967 Methods for isolation and enumeration of lipolytic organisms. Journal of Dairy Science 50 477484CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
International Dairy Federation 1966 Standard method for the count of lipolytic organisms. FIL-IDF 41:1966Google Scholar
Juffs, H. S. 1972 Proteolysis in cold stored milk with particular reference to the role of Pseudomonas spp. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaGoogle Scholar
Law, B. A. 1979 Reviews of the progress of dairy science: Enzymes of psychrotrophic bacteria and their effects on milk and milk products. Journal of Dairy Research 46 573588CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyle Von Reissen, V. 1975 Convenient, simplified preparation of less commonly used media. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2 554555Google Scholar
Marshall, R. T. 1982 Relationship between the bacteriological quality of raw milk and the final products. A review of basic information and practical aspects. Kieler Milchwirtschaftliche Forschungsberichte 34 149157Google Scholar
Mourey, A. & Kilbertus, G. 1976 Simple media containing stabilized tributyrin for demonstrating lipolytic bacteria in foods and soils. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 40 4751CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rapp, M. 1978 Selective nutrient media for the detection of lipolytic microorganisms. 20th International Dairy Congress, Paris E 355356Google Scholar
Richards, T. 1946 Bacterial lipolysis and rancidity in fats. Proceedings of the Society for Applied Bacteriology 9 104CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shelley, A. W. 1985 Studies on lipolytic psychrotrophic bacteria from raw milk. M.Sc. Thesis. University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaGoogle Scholar
Shelley, A. W., Deeth, H. C. & Macrae, I. C. 1987 Review of methods of enumeration, detection and isolation of lipolytic microorganisms with special reference to dairy applications. Journal of Microbiological Methods 6 123137CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sierra, G. 1957 A simple method for the detection of lipolytic activity of microorganisms and some observations on the influence of the contact between cells and fatty substrates. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 23 1522CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smibert, R. M. & Kreig, N. R. 1981 Systematics: General Characterization. In Manual of Methods for General Bacteriology p. 418 (Ed. Gerhardt, P.). Washington, DC: American Society for MicrobiologyGoogle Scholar
Standards Association of Australia 1976 Methods of microbiological examination of dairy products and for dairy purposes - lipolytic organisms in butter. AS 1095.3.4Google Scholar
Tuynenburg Muys, G. & Willemse, R. 1965 The detection and enumeration of lipolytic microorganisms by means of a modified Eijkman-plate method. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 31 103112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Comparison of a simple butterfat agar medium with other media used for isolation and enumeration of lipolytic bacteria from dairy products
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Comparison of a simple butterfat agar medium with other media used for isolation and enumeration of lipolytic bacteria from dairy products
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Comparison of a simple butterfat agar medium with other media used for isolation and enumeration of lipolytic bacteria from dairy products
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *