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Chemical methods for assessing lipid oxidation in ultra-high-temperature creams

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

W. K. Downey
Affiliation:
National Dairy Research Centre, The Agricultural Institute, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland

Summary

The flavour quality and stability of 3 different UHT creams are described. The rate of oxidation was measured by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) and peroxide methods as well as by organoleptic assessment. Lipid oxidation developed in some UHT creams on prolonged storage, particularly in creams manufactured during the winter months and stored at 18°C, while little or no oxidation occurred at 4 °C. Creams manufactured during the summer months were most resistant to oxidation. Creams with no detectable oxidized flavour had TBA values ≤ 0·08; values ≥ 0·16 and peroxide ≥ 2·0 were associated with pronounced oxidized flavour. These relationships between the chemical and organoleptic assessments were highly significant (P < 0·01). Low peroxide levels (< 2·0) were not necessarily indicative of good flavour quality.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1968

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