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Application of a linear regression model to study the origin of C17 branched-chain fatty acids in caprine milk fat

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 November 2019

Pilar Gómez-Cortés
Affiliation:
Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias de la Alimentación (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Nicolás Cabrera 9, 28049Madrid, Spain
Alfonso Cívico
Affiliation:
Departamento de Producción Animal, Universidad de Córdoba, Ctra. Madrid-Cádiz km 396, 14071Córdoba, Spain
Miguel Angel de la Fuente
Affiliation:
Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias de la Alimentación (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Nicolás Cabrera 9, 28049Madrid, Spain
Andrés L. Martínez Marín
Affiliation:
Departamento de Producción Animal, Universidad de Córdoba, Ctra. Madrid-Cádiz km 396, 14071Córdoba, Spain
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This research communications addresses the hypothesis that a part of iso 17:0 and anteiso 17:0 in milk fat could come from endogenous extraruminal tissue synthesis. In order to confirm this a linear regression model was applied to calculate the proportions of iso 17:0 and anteiso 17:0 in milk fat that could come from elongation of their putative precursors iso 15:0 and anteiso 15:0, respectively. Sixteen dairy goats were allocated to two simultaneous experiments, in a crossover design with four animals per treatment and two experimental periods of 25 d. In both experiments, alfalfa hay was the sole forage and the forage to concentrate ratio (33 : 67) remained constant. Experimental diets differed on the concentrate composition, either rich in starch or neutral detergent fibre, and they were administered alone or in combination with 30 g/d of linseed oil. Iso 15:0, anteiso 15:0, iso 17:0 and anteiso 17:0, the most abundant branched-chain fatty acids in milk fat, were determined by gas chromatography using two different capillary columns. The regression model resolved that 49% of iso 17:0 and 60% of anteiso 17:0 in milk fat was formed extraruminally from iso 15:0 and anteiso 15:0 elongation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Hannah Dairy Research Foundation 2019

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Application of a linear regression model to study the origin of C17 branched-chain fatty acids in caprine milk fat
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