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88 Assessing Perceptions of Institutional Inclusivity on Burnout, Intent to Continue Training, and Perceived Stress among Underrepresented Postdoctoral Fellows and Early Career Faculty

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2023

Chantele Mitchell-Miland
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh VA Pittsburgh Healthcare Center
Galen Switzer
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, Schools of the Health Sciences
Gretchen White
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, Schools of the Health Sciences
Michael Fine
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh VA Pittsburgh Healthcare Center
Leah Hollis
Affiliation:
Morgan State University
Tiffany Gary-Webb
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, School of Public Health
Natalia Morone
Affiliation:
Boston University, School of Medicine Boston Medical Center
Audrey Murrell
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, College of Business Administration
Doris Rubio
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh, Schools of the Health Sciences
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: The Building Up Study tests the effectiveness of an intervention aimed to diversify the workforce using a two-arm cluster randomized trial. We examined how underrepresented (UR) participants’ perceptions of institutional inclusion affected burnout, intent to continue training, and perceived stress. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Building Up was conducted at 25 institutions with 225 UR post-doctoral fellow or early-career faculty participants. To assess perceived institutional inclusion, participants completed a 28-item survey in the first year of follow-up. We used descriptive statistics to describe age, race/ethnicity, and gender. We used exploratory factor analysis to extract factors or domains (survey questions that grouped together). We calculated mean domain scores and used correlations to assess associations between each domain and each dependent variable (burnout, intent to continue training, and perceived stress). Demographics, correlation coefficients and associated p-values are presented. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: 130 of 144 eligible participants completed all questions. The mean age was 39 years (SD = 6), 83% were female, 35% identified as non-Hispanic Black, and 36% identified as Hispanic. Greater inclusivity was associated with lower burnout across 5/6 identified domains: policies (-0.3, p DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that institutional inclusion is associated with differences in capacity to function among UR postdocs and early-career faculty. Inclusivity of leaders was only associated with intent to continue training. Inclusion coupled with employee support and development are important for positive outcomes.

Type
Education, Career Development and Workforce Development
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2023. The Association for Clinical and Translational Science